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Event Calendar

Edward Albee Festival

MAR 5 – APR 24, 2011

Extras & Insights

“The function of the arts is to hold a mirror up to people, to say, ‘This is how you are. Take a hard look; if you don’t like what you see, change.’ The function of the arts is to bring order out of chaos, coherence out of the endless static, the gibberish of the stars, and to render people capable of thinking metaphorically.” – Edward Albee, “It Is the Dark We Have to Fear” (1989)

In Rehearsal

The Art of Life: Edward Albee photostextAt Home at the Zoo
At Home at the Zoo director Mary B. Robinson sits down and talks to Albee about his philosophy on art and the writing of At Home at the Zoo.
The Playwright’s Studio photostextWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Albee talks to Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? director Pam MacKinnon and Steppenwolf Theatre’s Artistic Director, Martha Lavey.
Fifty Years to Get Home: A History of At Home at the Zoo photostextAt Home at the Zoo
Follow At Home at the Zoo from first reading through opening night at Arena Stage.

From the Wings

Edward Albee: An American Giant photostextThe Edward Albee Festival
Investigate the life of one of America’s foremost dramatists.
Setting the Stage: An Interview with Designer Jim Noone photostextAt Home at the Zoo
Experience the physical world of the play with the set designer of At Home at the Zoo.
Getting Dressed: A Conversation with Designer Ted Stumpf photostextAt Home at the Zoo
Journey to the costume shop to learn about the clothes in At Home at the Zoo.
Tracy Letts and Amy Morton: Modern Theater's Power Couple textWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Meet the dynamic duo portraying one of theater's most volatile couples.

Spotlight On

A Look at the Zoo: The Status Quo and the Outsiders in 1950s America photostextAt Home at the Zoo
Delve into the historic decade The Zoo Story garnered international acclaim.
The Big, Bad Woolf photostextWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Discover the inspiration behind the title Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Walpurgisnacht: Between “Fun & Games” and “The Exorcism” photostextWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Trace the title of Woolf’s second act to its 6th century origins.
American Absurdism: A Guide to Edward Albee’s Life & Work photostextThe Edward Albee Festival
Travel from the 1920s through the 2000s with Edward Albee's Life and Work.
Double Responsibility: Edward Albee’s Adaptations photoslinkThe Edward Albee Festival
Explore the stories and events that inspired some of Albee’s plays.

Encore

Fun and Games on the Silver Screen textlinkWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Find out how the Pulitzer Prize-winning script of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was adapted to the silver screen.
A Woolf Glossary: Names and Allusions photostextaudioWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Learn the origin of obscure phrases and references in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
Read Deeper: Literary References in At Home at the Zoo photostextAt Home at the Zoo
Uncover Albee’s nods to two thousand years of mythology.

Extras & Insights is funded, in part, by a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities and by the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities, an agency supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

American Voices

Edward Albee

“Ideally a play should hold a mirror up to people and say look, this is the way you behave. This is the way you live. If you don’t like what you see here on stage, then why don’t you change? A playwright’s job is to ask interesting questions and expect the audience to provide some good answers.”

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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? = Who's Araid of Virginia Woolf?
At Home at the Zoo = At Home at the Zoo
The Edward Albee Festival = The Edward Albee Festival
video = section contains video files
audio = section contains audio files
photos = section contains images
text = section contains text
link = section contains hyperlinks